Nootropics For Energy Are Substances That May Improve Brain Function
Nootropics for Energy

Nootropics for Energy

Nootropics are substances that may improve brain function. Using nootropics for energy has become popular among exercise enthusiasts, performance trainers, and athletes. Learn how these compounds may improve muscle recovery.

What are Nootropics

Nootropics enhance cognitive function. They are made up of smart drugs, supplements, and natural nootropics from herbs and plants.

How Do Nootropics Work

Nootropics improves the mind by maintaining, repairing, and producing neurotransmitters needed for cognition and mood. They also provide essential nutrients that increase energy, blood, and oxygen flow to the brain [R].

Nootropics for Energy & Physical Performance

Fatigue is a result of increased inflammation from exercised induced damage to muscles and the central nervous system [R]. Nootropics are thought to reduce inflammation and increase blood flow and to the muscles.

Healthy males given 50 mg of theanine after bicycling for 60 minutes experienced accelerated mental regeneration [R].

Nitric oxide increases blood flow to the muscles helping to improve athletic performance and reduce fatigue [R].

Carnitine may also enhance blood flow and oxygen to muscle tissue. Muscle injury, soreness along with physical and mental fatigue will become alleviated [R].

Theanine in black and green tea is associated with changes in blood pressure and producing nitric oxide [R, R, R].

Lion’s Mane mushroom increased blood flow and reduced fatigue. It may also produce nitric oxide and reduce free radical production [R].

What to Look for in a Nootropic

Nootropics are not regulated by the FDA. Look for a product that is third-party tested, has Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and does not contain stimulants or additives.

How to Take Nootropics

Nootropics can be taken individually or together. These nootropic stacks consist of two or more nootropics. This is not recommended for those who are just starting out. Instead, start with as low of a dosage as possible.

Side Effects of Nootropics

Many nootropics have reported side effects that have occured. They vary by product and consist of the following: constipation, stomach upset, diarrhea, headache, drowsiness, insomnia, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, diarrhea, seizures, stomach cramps, dizziness, dry mouth, excessive saliva, loss of appetite, changes in blood pressure, mood changes, allergic reactions, sweating, blurred vision, slurred speech, and fainting

[R, R, R, R, R, R, R, R, R, R, R, R, R, R].

Contraindications of Nootropics

Nootropics may interact with other drugs and those with certain medical conditions including but not limited to the following [R, R],

● Psychiatric drugs

● ADHD drugs

● Anticholinergic drugs

● Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, or cholinergic drugs.

If you are pregnant, breast-feeding, have any health conditions and/or are on any medications it may want to seek medical advice to learn how these products may affect you.

Risks of Nootropics

Nootropics are not regulated and have been found to have unsupported marketing claims. Some have been found to be unsafe and in violation of the FDA’s standards [R, R, R, R].

Those with a history of mental health or substance abuse problems may be at more risk for adverse side effects [R].

There is no information on the effects of nootropic use past a few months.

Final Thoughts on Nootropics

The benefits of nootropics provide a great deal of improvements for brain health which can also be extended to improve muscle fatigue. Despite these benefits there is still a lot we don’t know about these supplements and their long term effects. Those with health conditions and on

medications should take caution before using these products. When in doubt ask your medical provider.

Resources

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